Annual Orionid Meteor Shower Peaks This Week

201 views Leave a comment

An Orionid meteor accessible by a NASA All Sky Fireball Network hire on tip of Mt. Lemmon, Arizona on Oct. 13, 2015 during 4:31 a.m. EDT. Credits: NASA

An Orionid meteor accessible by a NASA All Sky Fireball Network hire on tip of Mt. Lemmon, Arizona on Oct. 13, 2015 during 4:31 a.m. EDT.
Credits: NASA

​If you’re studious and we don’t mind sacrificing a few hours of sleep, we might be treated to some astronomical fireworks this week.

Orionid meteors seem each year around this time, when Earth travels by an area of space dirty with waste from Halley’s Comet. This year a rise will start on a night of Wednesday, Oct. 21 into a morning of Thursday, Oct. 22.

“The Orionids will substantially uncover weaker activity than common this year,” says Bill Cooke of a NASA Meteoroid Environments Office during Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala. “Bits of comet dirt attack a atmosphere will substantially give us about a dozen meteors per hour.”

The best time to demeanour for Orionid meteors is only before morning this Thursday, Oct. 22, when Earth encounters a densest partial of Halley’s waste stream.

Observing is simple: set a alarm a few hours before dawn, go outward and demeanour adult in a instruction of a constellation Orion. No telescope is required to see Orionids sharpened opposite a sky. While a meteor count might be reduce this year, observation conditions are favorable, as a gibbous moon will set by 2 a.m. EDT time, needing good observation only before emergence when rates will be during their highest.

A live tide of a night sky from NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center will be accessible around Ustream commencement Oct 21, during 10 p.m. EDT. The live feed is an choice for stargazers experiencing bad continue or light-polluted night skies. If a continue in Huntsville is clear, Orionids might be seen in a feed as early as 11:30 p.m. EDT, yet a hours before emergence should uncover a many Orionid activity.

The arrangement will be framed by some of a prettiest stars in a night sky. In further to Orionids, you’ll see a “Dog Star” Sirius, splendid winter constellations such as Orion, Gemini, and Taurus, and a planets Jupiter and Venus. Even if a showering is a dud, a rest of a sky is dynamite.

The subsequent meteor showering on rug is a Leonids, with a rise approaching from midnight until emergence on Nov. 18.

Source: NASA