Cassini Sees ‘Flying-Saucer’ Moon Atlas Up Close

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These raw, unprocessed images of Saturn’s moon, Atlas, were taken on Apr 12, 2017, by NASA’s Cassini spacecraft. The flyby had a close-approach stretch of about 7,000 miles (11,000 kilometers).

Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute

These images are a closest ever taken of Atlas and will assistance to impersonate a figure and geology. Atlas (19 miles, or 30 kilometers across) orbits Saturn only outward a A ring — a utmost of a planet’s bright, categorical rings.

Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute

Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute

Unprocessed picture of Saturn’s moon Atlas
Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute

The Cassini-Huygens goal is a mild plan of NASA, ESA (European Space Agency) and a Italian Space Agency. NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, manages a goal for a agency’s Science Mission Directorate in Washington. The Cassini imaging operations core is formed during a Space Science Institute in Boulder, Colorado. Caltech in Pasadena manages JPL for NASA.

Source: NASA

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