Companies Selected to Provide Early Design Work for Asteroid Redirect Robotic Mission Spacecraft

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Artists judgment of NASA's Asteroid Redirect Robotic Mission capturing an asteroid stone before redirecting it to a astronaut-accessible circuit around Earth's moon. Image Credit: NASA

Artists judgment of NASA’s Asteroid Redirect Robotic Mission capturing an asteroid stone before redirecting it to a astronaut-accessible circuit around Earth’s moon. Image Credit: NASA

NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif., has comparison 4 companies to control pattern studies for a solar-electric-propulsion-based booster for a agency’s Asteroid Redirect Robotic Mission (ARRM). The aerospace companies comparison for a initial studies include: Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Littleton, Colorado; Boeing Phantom Works, Huntington Beach, California; Orbital ATK, Dulles, Virginia; and Space Systems/Loral, Palo Alto, California.

ARRM is partial of NASA’s devise for regulating cislunar space, a segment between Earth and moon’s orbit, as a proof belligerent for destiny tellurian spaceflight over low-Earth orbit, in support of a agency’s tour to Mars.

The merger plan for a ARRM booster will precedence commercially accessible U.S. attention capabilities to revoke costs and cost risk. The plan includes buying of a ARRM booster train by dual phases. The initial proviso is pattern work achieved by studies by U.S. attention operative in team-work with a mission’s plan bureau during JPL to support goal formulation. The second phase, to be awarded around a second competition, will embody growth and doing of a moody booster train by one of a investigate participants.

ARRM is being designed to perform a series of demonstrations including a use of a 20-fold alleviation in low space solar-electric thrust (SEP) to pierce and scheme vast payloads; collect a stone adult to 20 tons in mass from an asteroid and route it to a crew-accessible circuit around a moon; and be a partial of integrated crewed and robotic car operations in low space.

Source: JPL