Dawn Heads Toward Final Orbit

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This mosaic shows Ceres' Occator void and surrounding turf from an altitude of 915 miles (1,470 kilometers), as seen by NASA's Dawn spacecraft. Occator is about 60 miles (90 kilometers) opposite and 2 miles (4 kilometers) deep. Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA

This mosaic shows Ceres’ Occator void and surrounding turf from an altitude of 915 miles (1,470 kilometers), as seen by NASA’s Dawn spacecraft. Occator is about 60 miles (90 kilometers) opposite and 2 miles (4 kilometers) deep. Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA

Dawn Mission Status Report

NASA’s Dawn booster dismissed adult a ion engine on Friday, Oct. 23, to start a tour toward a fourth and final scholarship circuit during dwarf world Ceres. The booster finished dual months of observations from an altitude of 915 miles (1,470 kilometers) and transmitted endless imagery and other information to Earth.

The booster is now on a approach to a final circuit of a mission, called a low-altitude mapping orbit. Dawn will spend some-more than 7 weeks forward to this vantage point, that will be reduction than 235 miles (380 kilometers) from a aspect of Ceres. In mid-December, Dawn will start holding observations from this orbit, including images during a fortitude of 120 feet (35 meters) per pixel.

Of sold seductiveness to a Dawn group is Occator crater, home to Ceres’ splendid spots. A new mosaic of images from Dawn’s third scholarship circuit highlights a void and surrounding terrain.

Source: JPL