Facebook, WeWork and others use this startup to make swag

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Swag, generally good swag, can be important. That’s where Swag.com comes in. The company, that launched 15 months ago, aims to be a approach for companies to get peculiarity swag to assistance people repute their brands.

“People consider of swag as junk, though it shouldn’t be,” Swag co-founder Jeremy Parker told TechCrunch. “It could be an extraordinary selling apparatus if it’s built right.”

Swag.com offers products like H2O bottles, umbrellas, shirts, jackets, USB drives, bags and other equipment from brands like Patagonia and Case Logic. Once we collect a product, we upload your designs, mention how many we wish printed and afterwards wait for Swag to send we a prolongation image for approval.

Standard prolongation time takes about 15 days, while priority prolongation takes 10 days and costs a bit more. Production doesn’t start until a patron has authorized a mock-up. Because Swag works directly with a manufacturer and vendor, it doesn’t have to reason any inventory.

“We’re like Barney’s though but a inventory,” Parker said.

Swag now has about 1,000 customers, including a likes of Facebook, Evernote, WeWork and Waze. With WeWork, Swag is integrated into a co-working space’s app for services, and is now a No. 1 use for bureau needs.

“We adore Swag.com since we know that any time we make an sequence it’s going to come out perfect!” WeWork Account Coordinator Casey Cadden pronounced in a statement. “Every product on Swag.com has been vetted and tested and they usually offer tip peculiarity products. Also, it’s insanely easy to use.”

Since starting a company, Swag has finished some-more than $1 million in sales. What differentiates Swag from a likes of CustomInk and other competitors is a courtesy to detail. For example, Swag guarantees any brand’s colors will be mark on, Pantone-matched.

Swag, that recently finished Techstars Chicago, has lifted about $800,000 in seed funding. Parker says a association is in a routine of shutting a turn of $1 million.