Mount Sharp ‘Photobombs’ Mars Curiosity Rover

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A new self-portrait of NASA’s Curiosity Mars corsair shows a car on Vera Rubin Ridge, that it has been questioning for a past several months. Directly behind a corsair is a start of a clay-rich slope scientists are fervent to start exploring. In entrance weeks, Curiosity will start to stand this slope. In a image, north is on a left and west is on a right, with Gale Crater’s edge on a setting of both edges.

This self-portrait of NASA’s Curiosity Mars corsair shows a car on Vera Rubin Ridge, that it’s been questioning for a past several months. Poking adult only behind Curiosity’s pillar is Mount Sharp, photobombing a robot’s selfie. Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

Poking adult only behind Curiosity’s pillar is Mount Sharp, photobombing a robot’s selfie. When Curiosity landed on Mars 5 years ago, a team’s goal was to investigate reduce Mount Sharp, where a corsair will sojourn for all of a time on Mars. The mountain’s bottom provides entrance to layers shaped over millions of years. These layers shaped in a participation of H2O — expected due to a lake or lakes where sediments accumulated, that shaped these layers inside Gale Crater.

The mosaic was fabricated from dozens of images taken by Curiosity’s Mars Hands Lens Imager (MAHLI). They were all taken on Jan. 23, 2018, during Sol 1943.

For news about other Mars missions this month, perspective a initial part of a new video series, “The Mars Report.”

In this initial part of The Mars Report we applaud a 14th anniversary of a Opportunity rover; uncover we a new breathtaking perspective from a Curiosity rover; and summation a “cool” find of ice deposits speckled by a Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. Also, we demeanour brazen to a InSight lander, streamer to a Red Planet in May 2018.

Source: JPL

 

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