NASA Makes Leaks Easy to Spot on Tape

212 views Leave a comment

The color-changing fasten helped pinpoint a hydrogen trickle during a Aug 2007 launch for convey goal STS-118. The record went on to be used in each successive Shuttle launch by 2011, shortly before a module was retired.

The color-changing fasten helped pinpoint a hydrogen trickle during a Aug 2007 launch for convey goal STS-118. The record went on to be used in each successive Shuttle launch by 2011, shortly before a module was retired.

From Apollo by a Space Shuttle, NASA has relied on glass hydrogen to fuel a top stages of a launch vehicles. Hydrogen is a many fit diesel there is: magnitude for measure, it provides some-more bearing when burnt than any other fuel source.

Harnessing that energy, however, requires a good understanding of technical know-how. For one, there is a plea of gripping hydrogen from evaporating by progressing it during temperatures next reduction 423 degrees Fahrenheit.

There’s also a ever-present jeopardy of leaks. Hydrogen, a smallest and lightest atom in existence, escapes by a minute of cracks — a poignant jeopardy deliberation that it’s also rarely flammable, to a indicate where certain high-pressure leaks can means combustion.

Knowing all of this this, NASA has prolonged taken critical precautions to guard a miles of pipelines carrying hundreds of thousands of gallons of rocket fuel to a launch pad.

In a early days of a space program, inspectors hold brooms to a pipes as they solemnly walked a lines. If a broom’s conduct began to burn, they knew there was a trickle burning. Later, during a launches of a 1980s and ’90s, they used ultraviolet sensors to detect flames; to find non-burning leaks they began utilizing electrochemical and flamable gas sensors.

Chemistry Class Revisited

These methods, however, were imprecise, as they could usually advise a ubiquitous area from that a hydrogen was originating. That was generally cryptic in areas where mixed send lines intersected. For this reason, Kennedy Space Center collaborated in a mid-2000s with a Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) during a University of Central Florida to come adult with something a small smarter.

The group of researchers started with a Japanese obvious for a hydrogen-detection fasten that changes tone when unprotected to a substance, though they wanted to make a tone change some-more noticeable. The group tested opposite combinations of a dual active chemicals in a tape, palladium oxide and titanium oxide, to find a brew that had a right tone contrast, could emanate a quick greeting and could be practical to a silicone-based tape.

HySense Technology’s Intellipigment fasten is easy to request and creates hydrogen leaks easy to spot. Credits: HySense Technology

HySense Technology’s Intellipigment fasten is easy to request and creates hydrogen leaks easy to spot.
Credits: HySense Technology

 

Two years later, another group of scientists and engineers from Kennedy softened a fasten to make it strong adequate to withstand oppressive conditions trimming from convey launches to uncontrolled weather.

From Launch Pad to Store Shelves

The fasten got a initial real-world exam with a launch of STS-118 in 2007, where it fast valid a worth: Kennedy’s area sensors rescued a participation of hydrogen on a launch pad, and a hydrogen fasten pinpointed a accurate plcae of a trickle so that crews could residence it. Afterward, a fasten was used for each launch by STS-134 in 2011, a program’s penultimate mission.

NASA and FSEC entered into a Space Act Agreement and a chartering agreement to sell a fasten commercially, ensuing in a origination of Rockledge, Florida-based HySense Technology.

Nahid Mohajeri, a chemist during FSEC who founded HySense Technology, says a advantages of a color-changing fasten are easy to see. “Stationary sensors have a shelf life and, depending on where they’re located, they competence not be means to detect each area that’s receptive to a leak,” she says. “And a handheld sensors need technicians to travel around and listen for a beeping sound.”

The 2014 RD 100 Award-winning record is now being used opposite industry, from chemical plants to gas producers and stainless-steel manufacturers. The record has also captivated seductiveness from automotive manufacturers that are building hydrogen-fuel-cell automobiles.

Source: NASA