NASA’s SDO Catches a Lunar Transit

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On Oct. 30, 2016, NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO, gifted a prejudiced solar obscure in space when it held a moon flitting in front of a sun. The lunar movement lasted one hour, between 3:56 p.m. and 4:56 p.m. EDT, with a moon covering about 59 percent of a object during a rise of a tour opposite a face of a sun. The moon’s shade obstructs SDO’s differently consistent perspective of a sun, and a shadow’s corner is pointy and distinct, given a moon has no atmosphere that would crush sunlight.

On Oct. 30, 2016, NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO, gifted a prejudiced solar obscure in space when it held a moon flitting in front of a sun. The lunar movement lasted one hour, between 3:56 p.m. and 4:56 p.m. EDT, with a moon covering about 59 percent of a object during a rise of a tour opposite a face of a sun. Credits: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center/SDO/Joy Ng

On Oct. 30, 2016, NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO, gifted a prejudiced solar obscure in space when it held a moon flitting in front of a sun. The lunar movement lasted one hour, between 3:56 p.m. and 4:56 p.m. EDT, with a moon covering about 59 percent of a object during a rise of a tour opposite a face of a sun.
Credits: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center/SDO/Joy Ng

From SDO’s indicate of view, a object appears to be jolt somewhat – though not since a solar look-out was spooked by this near-Halloween sight. Instead, a jolt formula from slight adjustments in SDO’s superintendence system, that routinely relies on observation a whole object to core a images between exposures. SDO prisoner these images in impassioned ultraviolet light, a form of light invisible to tellurian eyes. The imagery here is colorized in red.

Source: NASA