Northern Summer on Titan

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NASA’s Cassini booster sees splendid methane clouds flapping in a summer skies of Saturn’s moon Titan, along with dim hydrocarbon lakes and seas clustered around a north pole.

NASA’s Cassini booster sees splendid methane clouds flapping in a summer skies of Saturn’s moon Titan, along with dim hydrocarbon lakes and seas clustered around a north pole.

Compared to progressing in Cassini’s mission, many of a aspect in a moon’s northern high latitudes is now bright by a sun. (See PIA08363 for a perspective of a northern hemisphere from 2007.) Summer solstice in a Saturn complement occurred on May 24, 2017.

The picture was taken with a Cassini booster narrow-angle camera on Jun 9, 2017, regulating a bright filter that preferentially admits wavelengths of near-infrared light centered during 938 nanometers. Cassini performed a perspective during a stretch of about 315,000 miles (507,000 kilometers) from Titan.

The Cassini goal is a mild plan of NASA, ESA (the European Space Agency) and a Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a multiplication of Caltech in Pasadena, California, manages a goal for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate, Washington. The Cassini orbiter and a dual onboard cameras were designed, grown and fabricated during JPL. The imaging operations core is formed during a Space Science Institute in Boulder, Colorado.

Source: NASA

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