Opportunity’s Devilish View from on High

241 views Leave a comment

From a roost high on a ridge, NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity available this picture of a Martian dirt demon rambling by a hollow below. Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

From a roost high on a ridge, NASA’s Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity available this picture of a Martian dirt demon rambling by a hollow below. Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

From a roost high on a ridge, NASA’s Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity available this picture of a Martian dirt demon rambling by a hollow below. The perspective looks behind during a rover’s marks heading adult a north-facing slope of “Knudsen Ridge,” that forms partial of a southern corner of “Marathon Valley.”

Opportunity took a picture regulating a navigation camera (Navcam) on Mar 31, 2016, during a 4,332nd Martian day, or sol, of a rover’s work on Mars.

Dust devils were a common steer for Opportunity’s twin rover, Spirit, in a outpost during Gusev Crater. Dust devils have been an odd steer for Opportunity, though.

Just as on Earth, a dirt demon is combined by a rising, rotating mainstay of prohibited air. When a mainstay whirls quick enough, it picks adult little grains of dirt from a ground, creation a spiral visible.

During a ascending expostulate to strech a tip of Knudsen Ridge, Opportunity’s lean reached 32 degrees, a steepest ever for any corsair on Mars.

NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a multiplication of a California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages a Mars Exploration Rover Project for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate, Washington.

Source: JPL