Shape-shifting robots? Child’s play

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Alice Agogino calls it a “six-bar tensegrity structure,” though it’s indeed modeled on a baby’s toy. It’s a appliance in that firm tools are hold together not by nails or screws, though by wires, cables or effervescent bands, lending it some conspicuous properties.

How could a child’s fondle one day assistance us try other planets? Alice Agogino, and others, explain. Image credit: YouTube screenshot, UC Berkeley

How could a child’s fondle one day assistance us try other planets? Alice Agogino, and others, explain. Image credit: YouTube screenshot, UC Berkeley

“It can be squashed, it can be dropped, it can change a shape,” says Agogino, a UC Berkeley highbrow of automatic engineering.

And importantly, she adds, “you can indeed make a structure like this walk.”

In fact, Agogino and her associate researchers prognosticate tensegrity-structured robots walking not only in a lab, though on other planets, promulgation behind information and samples and employing their unique ability to scheme and navigate to emanate accurate maps of a planet’s surface.

As this video from KQED Quest creates clear, it will be some time before these rarely worldly “toys” are prepared to try interplanetary space. But that’s accurately what her lab, in unison with a group during a Dynamic Tensegrity Robotics Lab during NASA Ames Research Center, are aiming toward.

“It’s a form of problem-solving where we demeanour during a goal, and afterwards we work back creatively to demeanour during opposite ways of achieving that goal,” Agogino says.

And then, wonders KQED, “Who knows what these robots could learn out there?”

Source: UC Berkeley