This Desolate Ghost Town Is Hanging By A Thread Over The Bering Sea

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If you’re ever on a Bering Sea nearby Alaska’s King Island and conduct to see by a thick fog, we competence be met with a bizarre view. Clinging to a side of a island’s high precipice face on hundreds of stilts is a forlorn encampment of Ukivok. This was once home to a estimable race of Inupiat people called a Aseuluk, or “people of a sea.”


This was once a winter home of about 200 Aseuluk people, a sport and entertainment multitude that called Alaska’s imperishable cliffs home.

This was once a winter home of about 200 Aseuluk people, a sport and entertainment multitude that called Alaska

Wikimedia Commons

During a summer, they foraged for food on King Island and on a mainland, nearby what is now a city of Nome, where they would also sell carvings. During a winter, they hunkered down and wanted seals and walruses. They also fished on a ice. To stay in good spirits by a dim Arctic winters, they spent a lot of time dancing and drumming.


This is a sketch of Ukivok in 1892, when it was still a bustling community.

This is a sketch of Ukivok in 1892, when it was still a bustling community.

Wikimedia Commons


The Aseuluks’ time on King Island reached a sour finish in a center of a 20th century. At that time, a U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs forcibly private a community’s children and placed them in schools on a mainland. This left usually a adults to accumulate a food they’d need to tarry a winter, and left them with no choice yet to pierce to a mainland to make a living. By 1970, Ukivok was totally deserted.


Today, usually these hollow-eyed buildings sojourn as a covenant to a story of Ukivok.

Today, usually these hollow-eyed buildings sojourn as a covenant to a story of Ukivok.

NOAA

The Aseuluk people, yet they’ve relocated, still say a clever informative temperament and continue to live a lifestyle most like a one they had on a island. But for many, losing their ancestral home was traumatic.


NOAA


(via Information About Alaska, Urban Ghosts, Wikipedia)


Today, there is a plan in a works to make a encampment and island habitable again, with a ultimate idea of giving a Aseuluk people behind their homeland. There’s unfortunately no news on how a plan is going during a moment. Ukivok is now an involved chronological site, as a oppressive meridian threatens to clean a encampment off a map. Ukivok’s predestine stays uncertain, yet the story and the people live on.