This Haunting, Peaceful Visualization Gives You Bach Like You’ve Never Seen Before

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If we listen to a lot of music, we substantially associate certain visible imagery with sold songs. Digital cognisance — a new tech materialisation — creates multi-sensory practice by regulating lights to respond to a representation and generation of notes.

Animator Alan Warburton, for example, set Johann Sebastian Bach’s The Well-Tempered Clavier to a set of analogous lights in a gallery space. The dreamlike atmosphere and a beauty of a song make for a surreal experience.


The length and tone of a lights conform to any note’s generation and pitch.

The length and tone of a lights conform to any note

Vimeo / Alan Warburton


The stage doubles as a Bach exhibition.

The stage doubles as a Bach exhibition.

Vimeo / Alan Warburton

Because we can see any note as it’s being played, your bargain of a combination is increasing tenfold.


The lights keep resplendent as a camera pans out of a gallery space.

The lights keep resplendent as a camera pans out of a gallery space.

Vimeo / Alan Warburton


They go all a approach into a parking garage.

They go all a approach into a parking garage.

Vimeo / Alan Warburton


The empty, informed spaces turn definitely unrecognizable with a further of song and lights.

And if you’re feeling stressed, this is indeed a ideal video to watch. The music, played by Pierre-Laurent Aimard, is beautiful, and a complicated environment is a ideal contrariety to a richness.


See a whole opening here.

Vimeo / Alan Warburton


(via Colossal)


The whole routine took thousands of calculations to complete. According to Sinfini Music, who consecrated a piece, a computations were so endless that a plan compulsory a use of an army of computers.

You can see some-more of Warburton’s animations on his website and Vimeo channel. More of Aimard’s song is accessible on his website, too.