‘WT1190F’ Safely Reenters Earth’s Atmosphere, Provides Research Opportunity

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Just after 1:18 AM EST (6:18 AM UTC) on Friday, Nov. 13 an intent tagged as WT1190F reentered Earth’s atmosphere as expected above a Indian Ocean, only off a southern tip of Sri Lanka. The intent – many expected synthetic space waste from some prior lunar or interplanetary goal – burnt adult on reentry and was not a hazard to anyone on Earth due to a low firmness and tiny distance (3-6 feet or 1-2 meters).

Object tagged as ‘WT1190F’ reenters Earth’s atmosphere south of Sri Lanka on Nov. 13, 2015 Credits: IAC/UAE/NASA/ESA

Object tagged as ‘WT1190F’ reenters Earth’s atmosphere south of Sri Lanka on Nov. 13, 2015
Credits: IAC/UAE/NASA/ESA

The intent was rescued while still on a vast elongated circuit about a Earth on Oct. 3 by a Catalina Sky Survey (CSS), one of a NASA-funded asteroid hunt projects operated by a University of Arizona and located nearby Tucson. The U.S. Air Force Space Command had primary shortcoming for tracking it, yet NASA was also meddlesome in tracking this intent since a final arena was entering Earth’s atmosphere during an angle some-more like an asteroid from interplanetary space than of a standard square of space debris. This eventuality was therefore good to use some of a procedures that NASA’s Near-Earth Object Observations Program would follow if a tiny asteroid were on a collision march with Earth. Those procedures embody detecting and tracking of a object, characterizing a earthy parameters, calculating a arena with high pointing modeling, and delivering accurate predictions to scientists who would like to observe a entrance by Earth’s atmosphere.