Cloud Bands Streak Across Titan

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The perspective was performed during a apart (non-targeted) flyby, during that Cassini upheld 303,000 miles (488,000 kilometers) above a moon’s surface. Although Cassini will have no serve close, targeted flybys of Titan, a booster continues to observe a hulk moon and a atmosphere from a distance.

NASA’s Cassini booster prisoner this perspective of bands of bright, leafy methane clouds flapping opposite Saturn’s moon Titan on May 7, 2017.

The perspective was performed during a apart (non-targeted) flyby, during that Cassini upheld 303,000 miles (488,000 kilometers) above a moon’s surface. Although Cassini will have no serve close, targeted flybys of Titan, a booster continues to observe a hulk moon and a atmosphere from a distance.

The dim regions during tip are Titan’s hydrocarbon lakes and seas.

Two versions of this picture are presented here, one with stronger encouragement (figure A) and one with many softer encouragement (figure B). See PIA21610 for another perspective of these clouds.

The picture was taken on May 7, 2017, during a stretch of 316,000 miles (508,000 kilometers). The perspective is an orthographic projection centered on 57 degrees north latitude, 48 degrees west longitude. An orthographic perspective is many like a perspective seen by a apart observer. Image scale is about 2 miles (3 kilometers) per pixel.

The Cassini goal is a mild plan of NASA, ESA (the European Space Agency) and a Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a multiplication of Caltech in Pasadena, California, manages a goal for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate, Washington. The Cassini orbiter and a dual onboard cameras were designed, grown and fabricated during JPL. The imaging operations core is formed during a Space Science Institute in Boulder, Colorado.

Source: NASA

 

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