Deepest-Ever Dive Through Enceladus Plume Completed

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NASA's Cassini booster finished a deepest-ever dive by a icy plume of Enceladus on Oct. 28, 2015. Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

NASA’s Cassini booster finished a deepest-ever dive by a icy plume of Enceladus on Oct. 28, 2015. Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

Cassini Mission Status Report

NASA’s Cassini booster successfully finished a tighten flyby of Saturn’s moon Enceladus today, flitting 30 miles (49 kilometers) above a moon’s south frigid segment during approximately 8:22 a.m. PDT (11:22 a.m. EDT). Mission controllers determined two-way communication with a booster this afternoon and design it to start transmitting information from a confront this evening. Images are expected in a subsequent 24 to 48 hours.

The Cassini-Huygens goal is a mild plan of NASA, ESA (European Space Agency) and a Italian Space Agency. NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, manages a goal for a agency’s Science Mission Directorate in Washington. JPL is a multiplication of a California Institute of Technology in Pasadena. The Cassini imaging operations core is formed during a Space Science Institute in Boulder, Colorado.

Source: JPL