These People Were Taken Seriously, But Then Everyone Found Out What They Believed In

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By Joseph Hayes, Contributor

During a year 1927, Quentin Craufurd, a contriver of a wireless write and a 50-year-old ex navy officer, would keep a penetrating ear on his radio.

Craufurd was not listening, however, to a BBC Radio use that had been founded that year. Instead, his aim was to make hit with fairies as partial of an experiment. These experiments would continue until 1932 and Craufurd would explain success in detecting what he believed were “nine mire fairies.”

And Craufurd was no sole tinkerer. He was partial of a organisation famous as “The Fairy Investigative Society,” that would count among a members Air Chief Marshal Hugh Dowding, famous for heading Great Britain’s invulnerability opposite Nazi Germany during a Battle of Britain.

In twentieth-century Britain, discussions of fairies were hugely renouned and frequently seemed in a newspaper. In fact, hunt on a British Newspaper Archive for fairies reveals 593,629 entries between 1900 and 1949.

In twentieth-century Britain, discussions of fairies were hugely renouned and frequently seemed in a newspaper. In fact, hunt on a British Newspaper Archive for fairies reveals 593,629 entries between 1900 and 1949.

The Forean Times

This recognition was reflected in a barbarous Cottingley Fairies Incident of 1917. This began when a array of photographs of supposed fairies taken by Frances Griffin and Elsie Wright and promoted by Sherlock Holmes author Arthur Conan Doyle gained outrageous attention. Doyle unsurprisingly would keep in contact with many during a Fairy Investigation Society over a years.

Although a Cottingley photographs were after suggested to be hoaxes, a existence of fairies remained a low faith for many. It was on Nov 4,1927 that a Daily Express drew courtesy to a origination of a “Fairy Research Society.”

Despite this publicity, many of those concerned in a review clung to secrecy.

Despite this publicity, many of those concerned in a review clung to secrecy.

Flickr / Just Another Shot

As Craufurd states concerning one such surreptitious meeting, “Mrs. Claire Cantlon, a angel seer, was afterwards a Hon. Secretary, and a few of us met during a residence in London. These were a serene days. It was a process of a Society to sojourn rather secret, for we listened accounts from members who wished to censor their temperament given they hold high central positions, and we listened adequate to know how strongly fairy-vision was established.”